Consumer Advisory Bulletin

Insist On A Professional Roofing Contractor

Buying a new roof is an important investment. Before you spend your money, spend some time learning how to evaluate the roofing contractor. It pays to remember that all roofing contractors are not alike. The NRCA (National Roofing Contractors Association) recommends that you pre-qualify your roofing contractor to get the job done right the first time.

  • A professional roofing contractor will have full-time employees, not just sub-contractors.
  • A professional roofing contractor will have a permanent place of business including an office and warehouse/shop, not just a sales office/or a residence.
  • A professional roofing contractor will provide you with a written proposal to compare apple to apples, not just a verbal quote.
  • A professional roofing contractor will provide you with written material and labor warranties.
  • A professional roofing contractor will be fully insured and able to provide you with general liability insurance and workman compensation insurance for employees. Otherwise, you could be liable for any damages or injuries.
  • A professional roofing contractor is financially stable. Ask for bank and supplier references and check them out.
  • A professional roofing contractor will be able to provide you with references from past jobs, not only from the last hailstorm but 10-20 years back.
  • A professional roofing contractor will have a foreman on-site during the entire re-roof process and will be able to answer any questions you might have.
  • A professional roofing contractor is a member of local, regional and national industry associations such as NRCA.
  • A professional roofing contractor is Manufacturer-approved for the type of system they are installing. Certain manufacturers require the installer to be a certified applicator.
  • A professional roofing contractor has a clean record with the Better Business Bureau. Check out complaints before considering.

Keep a healthy scepticism about the lowest bid. Many fly-by-night contractors seem attractive with their below-cost bids, but are often uninsured, use sub-contract labor and perform sub-standard work.